On 4 July, IS branch in eastern Libya, known as Wilayat Barqah, released a new video titled “The Point of Death” documenting its recent attacks against Libyan National Army (LNA) checkpoints in the Oil Crescent, the beheading of LNA soldiers, and interviews with four suicide bombers. This is the first video from IS-Barqah since September 2017.

On 6 July, in the most recent edition (No. 138) of their digital newspaper al-Naba’, IS published a photo showing the captivity of two Libyan National Army (LNA) fighters who had been abducted just over a week before. On 26 June, IS fighters kidnapped two LNA air force and air defense officers, identified as Colonels Abdullah Hamad Bouamoud Zawawi and Mostafa Nasser al-Khuraisi, while they participated in a social gathering in the desert area between Zallah and Waddan. The officers were identified by their military uniforms.


Other Jihadi Actors

Last week, the Libyan National Army’s 101 Brigade published photos that circulated on social media of senior al-Qaeda leader Sufiyan Bin Qammu amongst other al-Qaeda militants in Darnah. Qammu is thought to be a prominent al-Qaeda theoretician in Libya and is known within the group as “The Libyan Knight.”

A weekly update of ISIS’s actions, the Western response, and developments pertaining to Libya’s other militias is available by subscribing here. To read about Western countries’ responses to ISIS in Libya this week, click here, and to read about the developments within the anti-ISIS Coalition of Libyan militias, click here. To read all four sections of this week’s Eye on ISIS in Libya report, click here.

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Your Sons Are At Your Service: Tunisia's Missionaries of Jihad

Two week ago, the Tunisian Seif Allah H. was arrested in Cologne, Germany for preparing Ricin using an Islamic State manual to conduct a terrorist attack. This case has gotten more attention recently in the Anglo press.

This case reminded me of one of the Islamic State border documents that involved a Tunisian that had been living in Germany before joining IS in Syria. He also happened to have chemical experience. This is likely a coincidence and not the same person since these two individuals have different real names (though with the one in the IS border documents I will not be disclosing his real name).

While with IS, the individual went by the name Abu al-Qasim al-Qayrawani. He was born on January 29, 1985, meaning when he joined IS on September 26, 2013 he was twenty-eight years old. He originally grew up in Tebourba, Tunisia, about twenty miles northwest of…

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On 14 June, unconfirmed reports suggest IS and Benghazi Defence Brigade fighters were spotted near the village of Harawa, 50 km east of Sirte. Libyan National Army al-Saiqa Special forces are said to have mobilized to the location in response to the reports.


Other Jihadi Actors

On 16 June, the Libyan National Army (LNA) claimed to have captured al-Qaeda linked Ansar al-Sharia commander Sufian bin Qumu during a raid in northern Derna. Bin Qumu is reported to have been the personal driver of Osama bin Laden while he was in Sudan.

On 14 June, two senior leaders of the Benghazi Defence Brigade (BDB), Ahmad al-Tajouri and Faraj Shaku, were allegedly killed by airstrikes as they moved from Bani Walid to the Oil Crescent. Families held a wake on Saturday in the Zureik area of Misrata and a group from Ajdabiya allegedly attempted unsuccessfully to bury the bodies. Prior to becoming a member of the BDB, Faraj Shaku was a commander of the now-disbanded Benghazi Revolutionaries Shura Council (BSRC) and the February 17 Martyrs’ Brigade, while Ahmad al-Tajouri was the former leader of the BRSC hailing from the Tajuri district of Benghazi.


A weekly update of ISIS’s actions, the Western response, and developments pertaining to Libya’s other militias is available by subscribing here. To read about Western countries’ responses to ISIS in Libya this week, click here, and to read about the developments within the anti-ISIS Coalition of Libyan militias, click here. To read all four sections of this week’s Eye on ISIS in Libya report, click here.

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Your Sons Are At Your Service: Tunisia's Missionaries of Jihad

On May 29, Benjamin Herman, a 35-year-old Belgian, on a 48-hour leave from prison, stabbed two female police officers, took their guns, shot and killed them and a civilian in Liège, Belgium before being killed after taking another women hostage. The attack was claimed by the Islamic State a day later.

Herman had been serving a continuous series of prison sentences for theft, assault, and drug offenses since 2003. It is within the prison system that Belgian officials believe he came into contact with militant figures within the jihadi movement. According to a prison administration report from 2015, Herman had contacts with the Tunisians Nizar Trabelsi and Amor Sliti, the latter a naturalized Belgian citizen, from the time he was incarcerated in Arlon prison. This is three years after Herman converted to Islam in 2012.

But if Herman was somehow connected to Trabelsi or Sliti it would have happened a long…

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Your Sons Are At Your Service: Tunisia's Missionaries of Jihad

In light of the recent Islamic State claimed attack in Tunisia and confusion by some on Twitter on when the last IS attack was in Tunisia I thought it would be useful to write up a post that helps clarify the issue and shows all of the IS attacks that have occurred in Tunisia. These are based on claims of responsibility from the Islamic State’s Tunis Media Office, Amaq News Agency, al-Naba’ Newsletter, and al-Bayan Radio as well as Jund al-Khilafa in Tunisia’s Ajnad al-Khilafah bi-Ifriqiya Media Foundation. The latter was used prior to IS officially claiming responsibility. The language below is how IS/JKT claimed responsibility.

June 3, 2018: Bombing the Douleb Gas Pipeline to Eastern Sfax With An IED Planted By Fighters of the Islamic State.

April 10, 2018: Killing a Sergeant in the Tunisian Army and Wounding Other Soldiers Following a Clash With Islamic State Fighters in Jabal al-Maghilah in Kasserine Governorate.

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For prior parts see: #120, #119#118#117#116#115#114#113#112#111#110#109#108#107#106#105#104#103#102#101#100#99#98#97#96#95#94#93#92#91#90#89#88#87#86#85#84#83#82#81#80#79#78#77#76#75#74#73#72#71#70#69#68#67#66#65#64#63#62#61#60#59#58#57#56#55#54#53#52#51#50#49#48#47#46#45#44#43#42#41#40#39#38#37#36#35#34#33#32#31#30#29#28#27#26#25#24#23#22#21#20#19#18#17#16#15#14#13#12#11#10#9#8#7#6#5#4#3#2, and #1.

Click the following link for a safe PDF copy: The Islamic State — al-Nabā’ Newsletter #121

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Source: https://ia601508.us.archive.org/15/items/naba121

To inquire about a translation for this newsletter issue for a fee email: azelin@jihadology.net